French Exit nearly had me exiting the book, but I’m glad I didn’t

Any book set in Paris is irresistible to me. French Exit by Patrick deWitt, who also wrote The Sisters Brothers, is a contemporary novel that reads like a 1930's farce. When I first started reading, the language struck me as peculiar; the characters were caricatures and the plot implausible. But the further into it I got, the more intrigued I became. French Exit was short-listed for the 2018 Scotiabank Giller Prize, so there were obviously people much smarter than I am who thought the book worth finishing so I soldiered…

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Anna Porter’s memoir is a gift to Canadian readers

If you're a lover of Canadian literature, then you're in for a treat. Anna Porter, author of In Other Words, How I Fell in Love with Canada One Book at a Time, is an author and former publisher extraordinaire with a pedigree spanning decades in the book business. I first became aware of her in the early seventies when she was profiled in Canadian magazines and newspapers as someone to keep an eye on. As a baby boomer and working mother of two young girls Anna Porter moved in the…

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How much can a parent withstand?

On October 10th I was honoured to be a guest speaker on The Joy of Retirement at an alumni luncheon for former employees of Coca-Cola Canada Ltd. in Toronto. I was preceded by a former employee of Coca-Cola, Debbie Sands, who had written a book about her family's challenges with their second daughter, Amy. A Moth To The Flame is the story of Amy's struggles with what was most likely Borderline Personality Disorder, a mental illness that Amy seemed to display from the time she was a baby but went…

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White Teeth are regular characters in Zadie Smith’s British romp

British author Zadie Smith is not everyone's cup of tea. I gave up on her novel NW after several tries (thought it was an absolute mess) but I enjoyed Swing Time. I was in a bit of a reading dry spell waiting for several books to become available at the library so I decided to have a go at Smith's first novel, White Teeth. It's the multi-layered story of three generations of immigrants living in Birmingham, trying to cope with blending old country cultures and values with their new life…

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Anne Tyler satisfies the woman in us

Reading an Anne Tyler novel is like eating an Oreo cookie. It's predictable, consistently chocolate and always satisfying without competing for any great culinary baking stars. Her latest book "Clock Dance" has all the usual ingredients—a baby boomer woman, a reckoning around home and family and it's partially baked in Baltimore, Maryland, a familiar setting for Tyler novels. Willa Drake is the older of two sisters born into a typical family of the 1960s. Her father is steady, solid and the salt of the earth. Her mother, on the other…

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