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Princess Diana once confessed that she enjoyed ironing. I totally get it. Like Di, I find the job of ironing to be somewhat zen-like, calming and relaxing. Ever since I started setting my ironing board up in front of the television to watch The Mary Tyler Moore Show in the seventies, I can honestly say I do not regard it as a chore. But my instruments and environment have to be exactly to my specifications, much like professional chess players, athletes and Glenn Gould. When the world’s fastest typist, the late Barbara Blackburn once failed to meet her usual high output of up to 212 wpm on a manual typewriter in front of an audience, she attributed her disappointing performance to her chair being adjusted one-quarter of an inch too low. We artists have specific standards.

Ever since my Mary Tyler Moore-watching days, I’ve scheduled my ironing to coincide with watching a favourite television show and the time just flies by. After putting up with a wobbly, inferior ironing board for years, I finally bit the bullet and purchased one of those sturdy extra-wide European models that cost about $150.00 and I can vouch for the fact they are so worth the money. It’s solid, has a rack for piling finished garments, an attached rack for the iron and slots in the frame for stacking empty hangers. Of course, a proper ironing board requires a serious iron that can guarantee an abundance of steam. Thus, another serious investment in a Rowena iron. Fortunately I haven’t yet felt the need for a Miele electric mangle for pressing sheets, pillowcases and tablecloths which is fortunate as they cost more than $3,000.00, Other than hotels and restaurants, who uses that many tablecloths?

One place where I draw the line, however, is men’s shirts. My husband’s wardrobe has been carefully curated so his everyday shirts are no-iron and dress shirts are handled by the dry cleaner. Does that make me a bad wife? I don’t mind ironing my own things, but men’s shirts are just plain drudgery. I once had a friend whose husband did all the ironing and he threatened to quit unless she stopped buying 100% cotton blouses. He understood the difference between work and pleasure.

You can’t deny it’s a beautiful thing.

I also have a passion for 100% linen tea towels—not cotton and not 50/50. I like to pick them up as souvenirs from places I’ve visited. It’s particularly satisfying to iron linen tea towels which always look so colourful, crisp and orderly when neatly pressed and stacked next to a pile of freshly ironed pillow cases. I use scented linen water to spray whatever I’m ironing so my spirits are always uplifted by the scents of lavender or ocean breezes. And there’s nothing as satisfying as admiring a line of freshly ironed blouses and tops. Call me crazy but it’s a truly rewarding sight. Let’s be clear. This doesn’t mean you can start sending me your laundry to iron. The Marilyn Denis Show and CityLine are each only an hour-long and there’s only so much I can accomplish in such a tight time frame. We don’t want it to become work and we have our standards.

Stay special mes très chères.

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This Post Has 9 Comments

  1. OMG…… obviously different strokes for different folks. I certainly have a better use for $150 than an ironing board….. like the purchase of a couple of iron free shirts and the Zen like feeling I get browsing thru the mall.

    Gail from Oakville

    1. I could tell you didn’t really appreciate the home-made linen water I gave you a few years ago for Xmas – ha ha. As you say – different strokes.

      Lynda Davis Follow my blog at: http://www.boomerbroadcast.net Social commentary on life from a Boomer Broad’s perspective e-mail: lyndadavis1@yahoo.ca

      For further insights into the Boomer perspective on business, fashion, mind and body, order my new book, BOOMERBROADcast. It makes a great hostess, birthday or Christmas gift. Click on this link: http://www.lulu.com  or http://www.amazon.com

  2. Hi lynda
    I never like ironing maybe because I would do it for hours late at night
    My mother however loved ironing
    Every Monday and Thursday afternoon you could find my mom happily
    ironing as she enjoyed her daily
    soaps
    She pressed a really good dress
    shirt.

    1. That’s the secret. Find a good TV program and you’re golden. Thanks, Anne Marie.

  3. When I stayed with military family in Germany in the sixties for a while I helped out by doing housework including ironing sergeant husbands fatigues.

  4. I also enjoyed ironing as a teenager…..back when they still ironed sheets and pillowcases!! I continued this trend when I joined the Canadian Forces….we had to iron our uniforms every day and once I married I also ironed my husbands uniforms…..he polished our boots as a trade off!!! Worked for me!! lol

  5. Well,Bill and you should have an ironing get together. He irons Sunday mornings while listening to Michael Enrights show. Tell me more about this scented water!
    Caty

    1. So great to hear from you Caty. I buy the scented water from Bed Bath & Beyond but you can also make your own or order it on Amazon. There are recipes that can be Googled. I made it once as Christmas gifts and put it in empty fancy liquor bottles trimmed with ribbon and things. I remember it contained distilled water, an ounce or two of (cheap) vodka and a few drops of scented oil. Glad to hear Bill’s doing the ironing. Sets a good precedent! Are you still on the island?

      Lynda Davis Follow my blog at: http://www.boomerbroadcast.net Social commentary on life from a Boomer Broad’s perspective e-mail: lyndadavis1@yahoo.ca

      For further insights into the Boomer perspective on business, fashion, mind and body, order my new book, BOOMERBROADcast. It makes a great hostess, birthday or Christmas gift. Click on this link: http://www.lulu.com  or http://www.amazon.com

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There’s work and then there’s ironing

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