BOOMERBROADcast

Enjoy, laugh, disagree or simply empathize with those who lived life in THE sixties and are now rockin' life in THEIR sixties, and beyond.

Alice doesn’t live here anymore

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Alice Munro is without doubt a very good author – after all she recently won the Nobel Prize for literature. The thing is – and I’m embarrassed to admit this – I just don’t get her. In an earlier blog posting, I applauded her winning the Nobel Prize and was as proud as any Canadian could be. It motivated me to dig out my hard-cover copy of  reading1her latest book, “Dear Life” and give it another shot. About three-quarters of the way through the book I gave up – again. While her stories of the people and small town places in southwestern Ontario ring familiar, I find them tedious and depressing, which, as someone who grew up in a small Ontario town is understandable. But her story lines and writing style fail to make me want to turn the page and keep reading. If someone could explain why she was Nobel-worthy I’d be very grateful.

I’m just a simple lover of books, not a student of literature, an academic, a critic or probably even all that smart. So there’s obviously something I’m missing. There are so many other Canadian authors I like better than Alice Munro which makes the criteria for selection from the world-wide pool of Nobel prize contenders even more incomprehensible.

The answer I think lies in the subjectivity of the reader. I’ve also found that I rarely liked Oprah’s book club picks either. Some were wonderful reads but for the most part they were bleak and depressing. Similarly, the Giller prize winners consistently leave me cold. I no longer go out and buy the latest Giller books because I’m always disappointed.

My most reliable source of recommended great reading material is my reading2Boomer Broad friends. Our tastes are similar for the most part and when they’re not, I simply stick with the ones I like. My tastes run to historical fiction, non-fiction, humour, biographies and auto-biographies. You can check out what I’ve read lately in the Books section of my blog.  No more Alice Munroe. No apologies.

Author: Lynda Davis

As an early Baby Boomer, born in 1947, it seems to me that as we approach our retirement years, Boomers have gone from being the energy driving our nation to slowly becoming invisible. We risk losing our identity as society remains stubbornly youth-centric. And the irony is that Gen Xers and Ys are not the majority; we are. BOOMERBROADcast is my platform for being the voice of Baby Boomers, women in particular. We've generated a lot of changes over the decades but there's still a long way to go. After a 40-year career in the corporate world, I've taken up expressing the observations and concerns of our generation. Instead of pounding the pavement in my bellbottoms with a cardboard sign, I'm pounding my laptop (I learned to type on a manual typewriter and old habits die hard). If you have issues or concerns you would like voiced or have comments on what I've voiced, I'd love to hear from you. We started breaking the rules in the sixties and now that we're in our sixties it's no time to become complacent. Hope you'll stay tuned and if you like BOOMERBROADcast, share it with your friends. Let's rock n' roll! If you would like to be notified whenever I publish a new posting, click on the little blue box in the lower right of your screen that says +Follow→ Lynda Davis

2 thoughts on “Alice doesn’t live here anymore

  1. You are so right Lynda. I also have that problem with Margaret Atwood.
    Finished a book last night that I enjoyed Wonder by R. J. Palacio. Kate

    Like

  2. That is how I feel about the writings of Jane Urquhart …. also recipient of many Canadian awards!

    Like

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