Big Sky is neither a family saga nor a story about the wild west. It’s ‘way better.

Well! When I started reading Kate Atkinson's Big Sky I must confess the title led me to expect a family saga along the lines of The Thornbirds, or perhaps a story about the American wild west. Obviously, I hadn't done my homework about the author. Kate Atkinson is in fact a contemporary British crime writer with many novels to her credit that feature a recurring main character/hero by the name of Jackson Brodie. Brodie is an ex-cop who hung out his own shingle as a private investigator after he left…

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Big Sky is neither a family saga nor a story about the wild west. It’s ‘way better.
Young lady reading a book, pop art retro vector illustration. Interesting reading

The Silent Patient was a step outside my reading comfort zone

Murder-mystery-thrillers are not my usual choice for reading material. But, after reading The New York Times best-seller The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides, I'm thinking perhaps I should expand my horizons. I stayed up until after midnight last night to find out "whodunnit", then couldn't sleep thinking about all the plot twists. It's a psychological thriller written mostly in the first-person voice of a psychologist so if you're a fan of pop psychology then you'll love all the references to mental illness. Alicia Berenson is a temperamental artist with a troubled…

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Eric Idle lives and writes on the bright side of life

Several years ago I reviewed Monty Python alumnus John Cleese's autobiography So, Anyway (This Parrot is Definitely Not Dead). Another Python'er, Eric Idle has now come out with his version of their epic story and as a fan of their silly, British humour, I couldn't wait to read it. Always Look On The Bright Side of Life, A Sortabiography by Eric Idle is not only the title of his autobiographical book but the final chorus written originally by Idle for their famous movie Monty Python's Life of Brian. The song Always…

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Maud Lewis’s artwork lights up the McMichael Gallery in Kleinburg

Art speaks to me or it doesn't. My tastes are not sophisticated, informed or educated. When I see a painting or piece of art that uplifts me or makes me feel happy, I like it. It's that simple. Which is why I don't like winter scenes, paintings of crowded city streets on rainy days or industrial landscapes. I'll never appreciate abstract art because I just don't get it.Canadian primitive folk artist Maud Lewis's paintings make me smile, fill my heart and give me hope, so naturally, I love her work.…

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Japanese occupation of Singapore still resonates today

Every so often we read a book that gives us a renewed appreciation for when and where we were born. That's what struck me the most after reading How We Disappeared, a novel by Jing-Jing Lee. I've always felt I won the lottery being born in Canada as a baby boomer after the end of the Second World War. Growing up in a free country that offers so many opportunities and privileges as well as a comfortable standard of living is truly a gift.The main character of this book, Wang Di…

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Cathy Guisewite is back with the opposite of a graphic novel . . . a narrative cartoon

There isn't a boomer gal alive who hasn't at one time clipped a Cathy cartoon out of the daily newspaper and attached it to her fridge, tacked it to her bulletin board at work, or sent it to a friend. We were devastated when she 'retired' from her daily comic strip a few years ago but she's back in the saddle with a new book that picks up where she left off. Fifty Things That Aren't My Fault by Cathy Guisewite is like reading her famous comic strip in narrative style—fifty…

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