Triple feature: Movies for baby boomer audiences

The two months leading up to the annual Oscar ceremony in Hollywood is pretty much the only time of year movies are released that appeal to baby boomers. From December to mid-February there are actually some decent movies in theatres that don't involve monsters, wall-to-wall violence, sci-fi, zombies or irreversible annihilation of the planet. I've recently viewed three movies up for awards that I think you might find interesting: VICE: Christian Bale is a chameleon. His characterization of former Vice-President Dick Cheney is stunning and so different from the Irving…

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Triple feature: Movies for baby boomer audiences
Movie popcorn tickets border as a group of popped corn snacks with cinema ticket stubs in the food as a theatrical symbol for entertainment and the arts on an isolated white background.

All The Money In The World . . . doesn’t buy happiness

If you're a boomer like me, you probably remember the sensational newspaper coverage of a brutal kidnapping in the early seventies. Paul Getty, the sixteen-year-old grandson of the world's richest man J. Paul Getty, was snatched off the street in Rome and held for ransom of $17 million. The drama played out for several months. Getty Sr. refused to pay the ransom while the Calabrian organized crime ring who kidnapped him grew increasingly desperate. I clearly remember the universal shock and horror when we read that the kidnappers amputated Getty…

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Boomer feel-good movie felt limp

There aren't a lot of movies out there that appeal to the Boomer set, so when one finally appears, we organize a girls' outing, line up for our cheap seniors' tickets, then line up again for our gallon pail of Diet Coke and bucket of chemically questionable popcorn. That's what happened this week when my gal pals and I settled in to see Paris Can Wait starring Diane Lane and Arnaud Viard with a cameo by Alec Baldwin. The reviews weren't great but we figured it would be worth the…

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Florence Foster Jenkins soars above her abilities

No actor does watery eyes and tears better than Meryl Streep and both are evident in her latest movie based on real-life personality Florence Foster Jenkins. What came as a bit of a surprise was how comedic Streep is, although she capably displayed this talent in Julia and Julia several years ago. After watching Florence Foster Jenkins I came home and immediately Google'd her name to find out more about this complex person. Born into a wealthy family, Florence displayed a particular talent for music and as a child once…

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The Meddler entertains, but barely

The Globe and Mail's movie review gave it three out of four stars but me and my gal pal panel who went to see it yesterday would only give it two out of four, and we're a pretty astute bunch. We enjoyed it, somewhat, but can't say any of us were overly impressed. And that's from four women who can strongly relate to the main character. Susan Sarandon stars as Marni, the Brooklyn-bred mother of Lori, played by Rose Byrne, who follows her screen-writer daughter to Los Angeles following the…

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Two movies about interesting women

Today we have a two-fer. Two movie reviews in one posting because they have similar themes—eccentric ladies of a certain age coping with life. I just saw The Lady in the Van and Hello, My Name is Doris within the past week and both were fun and worth the price of admission. The name Maggie Smith practically guarantees great acting, a worthy plot-line and good writing. Starring as Margaret Sheppard, an elderly bag lady living in her dilapidated van, her character is abrasive, funny, intelligent and unpredictable. Smith is delightful…

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