Canadian author investigates the dark side

Supporting Canadian authors is easy when given books such as Black Feathers to read. I first heard about this book by Robert J. Weirsema when he was interviewed by Shelagh Rogers on CBC Radio. The central character is a sixteen-year-old runaway named Cassandra Weathers who turns up in downtown Victoria on Vancouver Island and is quickly absorbed into the street scene. She is befriended by Skylark who helps Cassie learn where to panhandle most effectively, where to sleep, where to get a shower and where to find a community of…

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Heather O’Neill takes us down the rabbit hole

When I began reading Montreal author Heather O'Neill's latest book, Daydreams of Angels, I had no idea I would be diving into a genre I thought I'd left behind about sixty years ago—fairy tales. Her two earlier books, Lullabies For Little Criminals and The Girl Who Was Saturday Night were both gritty, eloquent accounts of young adults growing up in the unsavory neighbourhoods of downtown Montreal occupied by drug addicts and prostitutes. Although I knew her newest book was a collection of short stories, I was unprepared for fairy tales,…

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Heather O’Neill bangs it home

Waiting more than two months to download Heather O'Neill's new book, The Girl Who Was Saturday Night  from the library was worth the wait. I have a soft spot for Canadian authors and I enjoyed O'Neill's debut novel Lullabies for Little Criminals enormously. She writes about the grittier side of life in Montreal, Quebec through the eyes of a young teenager in her first book and a 20-year-old in The Girl Who Was Saturday Night. The main character, Noushcka is the twin sister of Nicholas. They are the illegitimate children…

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