It is written, therefore it is . . . retained

Albert Einstein was once asked a simple question for which he did not have the answer. The world-renowned genius' response was, "I don't clutter my head with things that can be found in a book.".  I knew there was a reason that story has stayed with me. And I certainly don't clutter my head with anything I can do without. The journal Psychological Science reports that tests on university students who hand-wrote their class notes instead of typing them on a laptop had better retention of what they were learning.…

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To “e” or not to “e”, that is the question

Digital e-readers are becoming increasingly more popular and are available in different devices to suit most individual preferences and pocketbooks. A divide does exist, however, between those who have embraced the new technology and those who prefer the traditional hard or soft-cover paper version. I have one foot firmly planted in each camp. On one hand, I love the convenience of downloading books from a retailer or the library from the comfort of my LaZ-Girl chair with a lovely cup of tea at my side. On the other hand, I'm…

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This #GIRLBOSS has her sh$# together

The first time I heard the name Sophia Amoruso was during a radio interview when she was promoting her new book, "#GIRLBOSS". This 20-something young woman was describing her path to becoming owner of a highly-successful on-line retail fashion business called Nasty Gal. Her business smarts were remarkable for someone so young and my heart sang when she outlined her advice based on lessons learned that were so in-line with my own that I couldn't wait to read her book. Amoruso was the rebellious only child of baby boomers who…

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Elizabeth is Missing

For a debut novel, Emma Healey's Elizabeth is Missing is remarkable. The book combines understanding and empathy for dementia with mystery and suspense. Maud Horsham is in her 80's and while still living in her own home with the assistance of her daughter and a daily caregiver, she struggles with the challenges of memory loss and confusion associated with geriatric dementia. She writes copious sticky notes to herself which she stuffs into her pockets to prompt her memory while her caregiver and daughter leave similar notes stuck to walls and…

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Heather O’Neill bangs it home

Waiting more than two months to download Heather O'Neill's new book, The Girl Who Was Saturday Night  from the library was worth the wait. I have a soft spot for Canadian authors and I enjoyed O'Neill's debut novel Lullabies for Little Criminals enormously. She writes about the grittier side of life in Montreal, Quebec through the eyes of a young teenager in her first book and a 20-year-old in The Girl Who Was Saturday Night. The main character, Noushcka is the twin sister of Nicholas. They are the illegitimate children…

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Revealing secrets of the Paris Ritz Hotel

When I originally downloaded the book Hotel on Place Vendome I thought it was historical fiction but once I started reading I discovered it was non-fiction which pleased me even more. Written and thoroughly  researched by Tilar J. Mazzeo, the book describes the opening of the world-famous hotel in Paris and its evolution from a modest, beautiful boutique hotel to the internationally-recognized institution it is today. The main focus of the book centres around the years when it was occupied by the Germans during World War 2. Residents included Hermann…

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