This #GIRLBOSS has her sh$# together

The first time I heard the name Sophia Amoruso was during a radio interview when she was promoting her new book, "#GIRLBOSS". This 20-something young woman was describing her path to becoming owner of a highly-successful on-line retail fashion business called Nasty Gal. Her business smarts were remarkable for someone so young and my heart sang when she outlined her advice based on lessons learned that were so in-line with my own that I couldn't wait to read her book. Amoruso was the rebellious only child of baby boomers who…

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Elizabeth is Missing

For a debut novel, Emma Healey's Elizabeth is Missing is remarkable. The book combines understanding and empathy for dementia with mystery and suspense. Maud Horsham is in her 80's and while still living in her own home with the assistance of her daughter and a daily caregiver, she struggles with the challenges of memory loss and confusion associated with geriatric dementia. She writes copious sticky notes to herself which she stuffs into her pockets to prompt her memory while her caregiver and daughter leave similar notes stuck to walls and…

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Heather O’Neill bangs it home

Waiting more than two months to download Heather O'Neill's new book, The Girl Who Was Saturday Night  from the library was worth the wait. I have a soft spot for Canadian authors and I enjoyed O'Neill's debut novel Lullabies for Little Criminals enormously. She writes about the grittier side of life in Montreal, Quebec through the eyes of a young teenager in her first book and a 20-year-old in The Girl Who Was Saturday Night. The main character, Noushcka is the twin sister of Nicholas. They are the illegitimate children…

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Revealing secrets of the Paris Ritz Hotel

When I originally downloaded the book Hotel on Place Vendome I thought it was historical fiction but once I started reading I discovered it was non-fiction which pleased me even more. Written and thoroughly  researched by Tilar J. Mazzeo, the book describes the opening of the world-famous hotel in Paris and its evolution from a modest, beautiful boutique hotel to the internationally-recognized institution it is today. The main focus of the book centres around the years when it was occupied by the Germans during World War 2. Residents included Hermann…

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The joy of menopause . . . the honest-to-goodness truth

Last week as I was watching Bill Maher on HBO, he invited author, speaker and performance artist Sandra Tsing Loh to join the panel at the half-way point in the show. This is usually when the new guest often has a book to promote. More than once I've enjoyed this part of the show so much I've gone on-line and ordered the book immediately and that's exactly what happened when I downloaded Tsing Loh's The Madwoman in the Volvo on to my Kindle before the show was even over. Subtitled…

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More geezer pleasers please

Last week my guy and I went to see The Grand Seduction, a light-weight movie about the efforts of the residents of a remote Newfoundland harbour community to attract a doctor. If they could land a doctor then they could convince investors to build a waste disposal facility to provide jobs for locals no longer employed in the fishing industry. As fans of Rick Mercer and 22 Minutes on CBC and going back even further to CODCO, we both love Newfie humour—smart, sharp and usually deftly delivered. Although a bit…

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